Geoinformation support of the Mediterranean Branch of the Silk Road

http://doi.org/10.35595/2414-9179-2019-1-25-102-113

View or download the article (Rus)

About the Authors

Oleg V. Stoletov

Lomonosov Moscow State University,
Leninskie Gory, 1, 119234, Moscow, Russia,
E-mail: oleg-stoletov1@yandex.ru

Ivan A. Chikharev

Sevastopol State University,
Universitetskaya Street, 33, 299053, Sevastopol, Russia,
E-mail: ichikharev@yandex.ru

Olga A. Moskalenko

Sevastopol State University,
Universitetskaya Street, 33, 299053, Sevastopol, Russia,
E-mail: kerulen@bk.ru

Daria V. Makovskaya

Sevastopol State University,
Universitetskaya Street, 33, 299053, Sevastopol, Russia,
E-mail: 76mdvl@mail.ru

Abstract

The article provides a geo-economic analysis of the Mediterranean Branch of the Maritime Silk Road of the XXI century (MSR-XXI). Its geographical boundaries are outlined and its role in the world economy development is denoted. The role of digital technologies in the development of megaproject MSR-XXI is analyzed, individual technological capabilities of its geoinformation support are considered.

China is currently the main destination and shipment of international shipping routes; the country plays a key role in international freight traffic and is increasingly actively engaging high-tech IT companies in the modernization of the digital network of ports of the MSR-XXI routes.

Several cooperation priorities that could be related to the states of the Greater Mediterranean highlighted in the Concept of cooperation at sea within the framework of the initiative “One Belt—One Way”: “Green Development”, “Development of the maritime space and marine resources”, “Maritime security”, “Innovative growth” and “Intergovernmental Cooperation”.

The development of the “Digital Ocean” concept, which is a large and complex system that uses objective marine phenomena as research objects, is based on the national information infrastructure (information highway), is of great importance for the megaproject of the MSR-XXI; it operates with spatial data about the sea and is supported by the newest information technologies. The relevance of the project is determined by the growing resource crisis in recent decades.

In 2018, Chinese researchers presented a unified model and standards for building the “Digital Ocean” platform, which allows to overcome the existing shortcomings of the concept and the absence of its single common structure. The article describes the main characteristics of the project. The implementation by China of the megaproject MSR-XXI provides for the intensive formation of the “Digital Silk Road” based on this platform.

Keywords

Greater Mediterranean, Maritime Silk Road of the XXI Century, geoinformation support, “Digital Silk Road”, “Digital Ocean”, China, global trade, international cooperation, infrastructure projects.

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For citation: Stoletov O.V., Chikharev I.A., Moskalenko O.A., Makovskaya D.V. Geoinformation support of the Mediterranean Branch of the Silk Road InterCarto. InterGIS. GI support of sustainable development of territories: Proceedings of the International conference. Moscow: Moscow University Press, 2019. V. 25. Part 1. P. 102–113. DOI: 10.35595/2414-9179-2019-1-25-102-113