Identification of changes in urban environment on the basis of the satellite data of the infrared range (on the example of Krasnoyarsk)

https://doi.org/10.35595/2414-9179-2019-2-25-90-100

View or download the article (Rus)

About the Authors

Anna A. Gosteva

Siberian Federal University,
Kirenskogo St. 26, ULK building., 660074, Krasnoyarsk, Russia,
E-mail: AGosteva@sfu-kras.ru

Aleksandra K. Matuzko

Institute of Computational Modelling of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ICM SB RAS),
Akademgorodok 50/44, 660036, Krasnoyarsk, Russia,
E-mail: akmatuzko@icm.krasn.ru

Oleg E. Yakubailik

Institute of Computational Modelling of the Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences (ICM SB RAS),
Akademgorodok 50/44, 660036, Krasnoyarsk, Russia,
E-mail: oleg@icm.krasn.ru

Abstract

A big city in the modern world has a strong influence on climate formation; specific microclimatic conditions are created on certain streets, determined by urban development, street coverage, distribution of green areas. The city, especially with a highly developed industry, pollutes the atmosphere above itself, increases its turbidity and thereby reduces the influx of solar radiation. The decrease in solar radiation is further enhanced by high buildings in narrow streets. Due to the same shroud of smoke and dust in the city, reduced effective radiation, and hence night cooling. At the same time, radiation reflected by walls and pavements joins the scattered radiation in the city.

An important feature of the city is the change in the microclimate of the urban environment. Such changes often occur as a result of changes in urban development, artificial relief changes, and the cutting down of forest plantations. Due to changes in the urban environment, there is a change in the microclimate of the city, which entails a direct change in the temperature of the earth’s surface.

Changes in the urban environment can be detected using space images of different spatial resolution in the visible and far infrared range. To study these changes, Landsat data is currently the most accessible, complete, and open. The method of visual analysis conducted on visible spectral channels makes it difficult to assess changes, especially in large areas. Thermal imaging is widely used for research and monitoring of man-made objects such as pipelines, urban facilities, industrial facilities and pollution. It is important that thermal images contain information that is almost impossible to obtain in any other way, for example, using images in the visible and near infrared range. In order to improve spatial resolution, Landsat 8 uses the synthesis of this image with images of a higher spatial resolution Planet Scope, which allows increasing the spatial resolution of Landsat 8 surface temperature maps from 30 to 3 meters.

Due to the active development of the city, there is a change in the microclimate of the city, which entails a direct change in the temperature of the earth’s surface. The paper presents the results of the assessment of the temperature of the earth’s surface in the city of Krasnoyarsk for a two-year period from September 2016 to September 2018 based on the analysis of Landsat 8 and Planet Scope satellite images.

Keywords

thermal infrared imagery, Landsat, Planet Scope, land surface temperature, climate of the urban environment.

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For citation: Gosteva A.A., Matuzko A.K., Yakubailik O.E. Identification of changes in urban environment on the basis of the satellite data of the infrared range (on the example of Krasnoyarsk) InterCarto. InterGIS. GI support of sustainable development of territories: Proceedings of the International conference. Moscow: Moscow University Press, 2019. V. 25. Part 2. P. 90–100. DOI: 10.35595/2414-9179-2019-2-25-90-100 (In Russian)