USING UAV LARGE-SCALE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR STUDYING HAZARDOUS GEOMORPHOLOGICAL PROCESSES

http://doi.org/10.24057/2414-9179-2018-2-24-158-170

View or download the article (Rus)

About the Authors

Elena D. Sheremetskaya

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Geography, Department of Geomorphology and Paleogeography,
Leninskie gory, GSP-1, 119991, Moscow, Russia,
E-mail: sheremetskaya@gmail.com

Maxim M. Ivanov

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Geography, The Makkaveev laboratory of soil erosion and fluvial processes,
Leninskie gory, GSP-1, 119991, Moscow, Russia,
E-mail: ivanovm@bk.ru

Egor V. Voroshilov

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Geography, Department of Geomorphology and Paleogeography,
Leninskie gory, GSP-1, 119991, Moscow, Russia,
E-mail: voroshilov@yahoo.com

Ekaterina V. Garankina

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Geography, Department of Geomorphology and Paleogeography,
Leninskie gory, GSP-1, 119991, Moscow, Russia,
E-mail: evgarankina@gmail.com

Vladimir R. Belyaev

Lomonosov Moscow State University, Faculty of Geography, The Makkaveev laboratory of soil erosion and fluvial processes,
Leninskie gory, GSP-1, 119991, Moscow, Russia,
E-mail: vladimir.r.belyaev@gmail.com

Abstract

Short-term transformations of actual topography and Quaternary deposits do not opportunely reflect in the open cartographic sources—on small-scale topographic maps and high-resolution remote sensing data. Thereby, the use of modern technologies for analysis of the spatial data obtained with unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) becomes quite relevant. High mobility and relatively cheap exploration determine broad perspective using UAVs data in regular geomorphological studies. It is also applicable in monitoring extreme and hazardous phenomena on either stages of detecting or observing the process itself and interpreting its consequences. Case study site of the Sengisjok River Valley bottom intensively transformed by debris flow processes including typical granular debris flows and specific slushflows was investigated. The mountain valley incises the Western slope of the Lovozerskiye Tundry massif at the Kola Peninsula, Northwestern Russia. Aerial photography survey was accomplished using the unmanned aerial vehicle (helicopter type) DJI Phantom 3 Standard controlled by human operator. Orthoimage mosaics, DEM and its derivatives (geomorphic interpretation, longitudinal and cross-section profiles of the modern valley and riverbed incisions of the Sengisjok River) were retrieved and analyzed. Linear and spatial parameters and dynamics of landforms with complexly arranged outlines and of different genetic types and volumes of reworked deposits were determined. The potential of immediate small-scale observations obtained by UAV was evaluated on the example of the case study site. As a result, a basic setup and implied algorithms for studying rapidly changing geomorphic units using unmanned aerial photography was proposed. It shows potential as for the fundamental scientific purposes as for monitoring and predicting hazardous process to ensure social awareness and infrastructure safety.

Keywords

Unmanned Aerial Vehicles, small-scale cartography, hazardous geomorphological processes, debris flow, Lovozerskiye Mountains.

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For citation: Sheremetskaya E.D., Ivanov M.M., Voroshilov E.V., Garankina E.V., Belyaev V.R. USING UAV LARGE-SCALE AERIAL PHOTOGRAPHY FOR STUDYING HAZARDOUS GEOMORPHOLOGICAL PROCESSES Proceedings of the International conference “InterCarto. InterGIS”. 2018;24(2):158–170 http://doi.org/10.24057/2414-9179-2018-2-24-158-170