SOCIAL NETWORKS AS SOURCE OF GEO-CARTOGRAPHIC DATA ANALYSIS

https://doi.org/10.24057/2414-9179-2017-2-23-172-182

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About the Authors

N. Karanikolas

School of Spatial Planning and Development Engineering
Russian Federation
Faculty of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

I. Toumpalidis

School of Spatial Planning and Development Engineering
Russian Federation
Faculty of Engineering, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki

Abstract

The main aim of this paper is to investigate the use of data accessible through social networks on issues pertaining to contemporary needs of geographic and cartographic analysis and configuration of today’s urban reality.

Today, with the widespread use of mobile devices and the free and easy access to the Internet, more and more people share information on their activities in social media.

This information may be accompanied by spatial data on the user’s location at the time of publication. Following the theoretical framework of participatory planning, which wants the design basis to be the citizen, social media are probably the cradle of this approach and this logic.

The use of such data creates a new perspective on how those involved with the spatial analysis can perceive the choices and needs of people even in real time.

In this paper, we will present the results of digital data correlation with the physical space to take advantage of the various sectors of modern urban centers. The method of collection and visualization of data and the issues have been reasonably created, examined and analyzed in the context of work.

Keywords

social networks, geographic analysis, urban and participatory planning.

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For citation: Karanikolas N., Toumpalidis I. SOCIAL NETWORKS AS SOURCE OF GEO-CARTOGRAPHIC DATA ANALYSIS. Proceedings of the International conference “InterCarto. InterGIS”. 2017;23(2):172-182. https://doi.org/10.24057/2414-9179-2017-2-23-172-182